EAS 066: How Julianne Went From Just an Allergy Kid and Multi-Award Winning Entrepreneur

Julianne Ponan is a multi-award winning entrepreneur who at the age of 22 took over the failing company Creative Nature as CEO and within 2 years took it out of debt. She is also a Virgin Startup Mentor and fellow grownup allergy kid. She has multiple severe allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, chickpeas, coconut, aniseed, some perfumes and many other foods.

I ask Julianne about growing up with allergies, how she has grown in confidence over the years and how that has impacted her life. From being the allergy kid at her own table, going to University and working in Beijing. Julianne reflects on her experiences of living with allergies and how they don’t have to hold you back and can be managed successfully.

We talk about how she has grown Creative Nature from product testing in the kitchen to her products being stocked in Tesco, Ocado, Co-op and soon Pharmacies. I also quiz Julianne on the factory protocols and standards to make sure products are safe, this is one of the companies that I actually trust because Creative Nature products are suitable for Julianne’s allergies (all apart from the peanut bar)!

Take a listen to find out more and learn Julianne’s advice for starting your own business.

Top 3 Tips When Living With Food

  1. Follow positive people in the allergy community
  2. Be honest with yourself because things aren’t going to change
  3. If you’re having a problem, get out there and make a difference

Leave a Review

Thank you to all of you who have sent me feedback. Your words of encouragement and how the podcast has helped you keeps me motivated to make more episodes!

If you haven’t already, please leave a review on iTunes.

Ask Your Questions

If you have a question about your own allergy journey or from the episode, leave a comment below or post in our very own Facebook Group.

Connect With Me

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Vegan Double Choc Cherry Brownies – dairy free, egg free, nut free, using Splenda

Vegan Double Choc Cherry Brownies – dairy free, egg free, nut free, using Splenda

Vegan Chocolate Cherry Brownies With Those You Love

Happy Valentine’s Day! It’s the day to celebrate love. What a wonderful idea, well I think so now. I was a bit of a cynic when I was younger I must say but now I’m all for it. This is because I think Valentine’s Day isn’t just limited to a romantic other, but to everyone special in your life. Your siblings, mum, dad, extended family and your friends! Valentine’s Day is for everyone.

When you have allergies, these other people in your life are so important. I don’t often get shy about my allergy but when I do I’m bawled over when my friends and family protect me and speak up when I’m feeling shy.

I’ll tell you about a time this happened recently. While I was on holiday in New York City I got to visit a really good friend, the fashion photographer Phoebe Cheong. We were out in Brooklyn and grabbing food, but I got a little shy and feeling bad about asking loads of questions about whether a food had nuts in. Then (without me saying anything) she chimed in too! Making sure the shop assistant was paying attention. I have to say it got me a little emotional. I forgot how good my friends are.

When we were at school together we were always doing something creative, and it usually had something to do with photography and or food! If I were with her right now we’d probably be baking, I’ve even created a recipe in my new cookbook inspired by her. (And we baked it together in NYC, video coming soon. Watch this space!) She bakes allergy safe with me even though she doesn’t have any allergies! And if she were here now I’d be trying out this gorgeous brownie recipe the lovely people at Splenda sent over.

Now amidst the drama of Peter Rabbit and the allergy-bullying incident, it’s quite nice to have a distraction and I love a squidgy chocolate brownies! Not to mention this recipe is dairy free, egg free and nut free, yay!

Making the Recipe Gluten Free

Unfortunately the recipe isn’t gluten free…at least not yet…!

When I’m baking with friends we always work out how to make the recipe so that it is free from everything I can’t eat. I’m usually the difficult one :p. This recipe is doing pretty well so far, but just the gluten needs adjusting. So how can we do that?

What you’ve got to know about gluten free flours is that they can be very thirsty and that makes the batter dry. For brownies you want them to be moist and gooey! So what I don’t do is exchange weight for weight of wheat flour to gluten free flour. Instead I reduce the total flour weight by a third. For example if the recipe calls for 1 cup of flour I use 2/3 cup of gluten free flour. Or if the recipe calles for 90g flour I use 60g of gluten free flour. I add a little at a time and stir. This way if I can monitor what is actually the right amount. If the batter is a little dry, then I add a touch of water to loosen up the batter.

Finding Allergy Safe Ingredients

You can use any pre blended gluten free flour mix you can find in the shops such as Dove’s Farm or Bob’s Red Mill, but my favourite by far is Free From Fairy’s Gluten Free Flour blend , you’ll need the plain flour for this recipe!

For dairy free (and nut free!!) chocolates my favourite brands are Plamil and Cocoa Libre.

Oh! and don’t forget the Splenda!

Checking Ingredients

When you’re buying ingredients, make sure you always check the ingredients and for allergy warnings to make sure products are safe for you!

What Allergy Safe Baking Is All About

Allergy safe baking is all about having a go. It may seem daunting at first, but you can always have fun, not to mention treats at the end! Get your friends and family involved or bake up a batch of these brownies to share. The more your friends and family get used to allergy safe, the more you’ll show them it’s easy and absolutely delicious!

Have an amazing time in the kitchen and enjoy your luscious brownies!

Vegan Double Choc Cherry Brownies

Preparation time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 25 minutes

Ingredients

  • 5 tablespoons of sunflower oil, plus extra for greasing
  • 210g dairy-free dark chocolate, chopped
  • ½ cup SPLENDA® Sugar Alternative, Granulated
  • 1 banana mashed
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 cup plain flour
  • ¾ tsp baking powder
  • ½ cup dairy-free chocolate chips
  • ½ cup dried cherries

·  Method

  • In bowl over simmering water, heat the chocolate until melted, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat.
  • Whisk in SPLENDA® Granulated until smooth. Whisk in the mashed banana and vanilla.
  • Mix flour with baking powder; stir into SPLENDA® Granulated mixture in two additions just until combined. Fold in dairy-free chocolate chips and cherries.
  • Spread in greased 8-inch (2 litre) square metal cake pan.
  • Bake in 180°C oven for about 25 minutes or until cake tester inserted in centre comes out clean with a few crumbs attached.
  • Let cool; cut into squares.

(N.B. This post is in collaboration with Splenda but all thoughts are my own.)

 

Want some more inspiration for Valentine’s day baking? Check out the other great recipes by the wonderful Free From Gang Bloggers:

The Best Gluten-Free All Butter Shortbread from Vicki at The Free From Fairy (GF, EF, NF, SF, Low Fodmap, Low Sugar)
Creamy Vegan Tiramisu Dessert (Top 14 free) from Midge at Peachicks Bakery (DF, EF, GF, NF, PF, SyF & Ve)
Vegan Valentines Biscuits from Emma at Free From Farmhouse (Ve, DF, SF, NF EF)
Raspberry Coconut Dark Chocolate Hearts from Nova at Cherished by Me (Ve, DF, GF, NF, EF, SF)
Fruit and Nut Chocolate Truffles from Rebecca at Glutarama (GF, DF, EG, SF, Ve)
His and Hers Vegan Valentine Parfaits from Jo at Modern Food Stories (Ve, DF, RSF, NF, GF, Grain free, EF)
Allergen Free Valentine’s Day Biscuits from Lauren at Dilan and Me (Vegan, DF, SF, EF, GF, NF)
Still to come…
Are you boycotting the Peter Rabbit Movie?

Are you boycotting the Peter Rabbit Movie?

To Boycott or Not to Boycott Peter Rabbit?

We all remember that cheeky little rabbit in a blue coat. We had the whole collection which we read when I was growing up. The mischievous antics of the young Peter Rabbit. This new movie adaptation of the Beatrix Potter classic, however, has the world in uproar.

On the movie review website Rotten Tomatoes, usually a good reference of actual peoples views I find, has given it only 51%. Rather than the rascal rabbit we know and love, critics say in this movie, he is being portrayed as a violent and psychopathic jerk. Could this be true? Well I’m not sure, I haven’t seen the movie yet. But this is only part of the controversy.

What’s All The Fuss About?

Well, it comes down to allergies. One of the scenes in the movie showPeter Rabbit deliberately throwing blackberries at McGregor with the knowledge that he is severely allergic to them. The next scene is said to be of McGregor stabbing himself in the leg with his epinephrine. The uproar has come over the lack of remorse and lessons learned by the young rabbit and so many believe it shows this type of bullying to be ok.

Peter Rabbit outrage from allergy campaigns

Allergy awareness and campaign groups in the states have called for a boycott of the movie in protest. The question now is, do we still go? Or do we boycott?

The movie company has issued an apology for their lack of sensitivity to this topic, but it doesn’t seem to have appeased the many allergy parents out there.

The Two Sides

Last night I posted a link and short message on the Eat Allergy Safe facebook page and the comments were torn. One side included those who were completely against going to the movie and those who would wait and see to pass judgement but would prepare their allergic children for what they might see.

I fall into the second bracket. I’m going to wait and see. We all know the news like to sensationalise stuff, but I prefer not to be sensationalised. I want to watch it and make up my own mind. After the bad reviews, unrelated to allergies as well, it might just come down to a badly written movie all round.

Things To Think About

As this scene has caused concern, I wanted to offer a few things to think about if you’re still deciding whether to see the movie. Or if you’ve seen it and now upset by it. I find that it’s all about how can we use a situation to our advantage and promote allergy awareness.

First up, when do we ever get allergies so front and centre in the news?! I have fellow allergy bloggers who are working overtime to use this opportunity to present the allergy community on national television and radio channels to give the facts of having and living with a life threatening allergy. That is a win!

Second, the movie is depicting what is unfortunately actually happening in some classrooms. It is unfortunate that Peter Rabbit is depicted as the bully, but it does throw a light on the fact that allergy bullying is happening, and it is not funny. Deliberately forcing an allergen in as person is like going at someone with a knife. Having this in a movie that is going to be seen globally opens up the chance to talk about this issue and start changing it! But we have to know what we are up against and then take the emotion out of how we respond so that we can actually get people to listen.

Third, the world is not an allergen free place. It never will be. As much as people petition to ban this that and the other from anywhere and everywhere. It doesn’t solve the problem. Ignorant people will continue to be ignorant people until they agree to be educated. It is our job as allergy sufferers to own our allergy and SHOW the world how we live safely, carefully and happily. Our allergy is our responsibility so we need to act like it.

A Plea to Allergy Parents

If you are an allergy parent and reading this, I urge you to use these types of opportunities to teach your children how to start facing and conquering their allergy challenges rather than hiding them. Your children might be young but these challenges will be the same their whole life, they don’t change. Your child’s friends will also ask about the film to their allergic friend, so better to prepare them to answer the questions confidently. Why not get their friends involved in the allergy education.

By the way, people still say the same things from being a kid with a nut allergy to an adult who still has one…I’ve heard it all and now I’m barely ever surprised or bothered. This is because my parents never hid the darker (anaphylaxis can lead to death) part from me, they just kept educating and encouraged my taking responsibility for my allergy. [link to podcast episodes with mum and dad]

What Will You Decide?

The Peter Rabbit movie has just been released in the USA and we in the UK have to wait until March to find out what the actually is going on. For me, I will be going to see the movie and make up my own mind, and the above post lays out my mindset before I’m going in. I want to make a silver-lining and I am going to watch it with an open mind. I don’t know what I’ll find until I watch it.

If you’re still deciding whether to boycott the movie or not, just remember it is your decision. Make the decision you feel is right for you and don’t let yourself be pressured by anyone to watch or not watch the movie. It’s your money and time so use it how you like.

If you have questions or comments, I’d love for you to join the discussion. What are your thoughts on the Peter Rabbit movie and depiction allergy bullying in the media? Leave a comment below with your thoughts.

How to Date With Food Allergies

How to Date With Food Allergies

It’s so wonderful to be in love. To get butterflies in your tummy, to break into a smile at just the thought of that special someone.  But for us, there’s an added dimension. Allergies.

How on earth, do you turn round and say “sorry, you need to tell me everything you’ve eaten and drunk today before I can even think about kissing you because if not, you could kill me with a kiss.” Kind of a mood killer…Unfortunately, it is just something we have to do. But how?

My Story

My other half and I met at University. I was a Fresher, halfway through my first year and he was doing his PhD. As we started to get to know each other, before anything romantic, I knew I would have to tell him about my nut allergy, especially if I wanted to kiss him.

Before I get more into the details, let me tell you a bit about who I was back then. I was one of those kids who always ate the brussel sprouts first because I thought they were gross. Most kids would push them to the side or hide them, but I knew Mum would insist I ate them. So, it was my view that I should eat the disgusting things first. This way I could take my time eating my favourite foods and not end the meal with a bad taste in my mouth. I still have this approach, and used it when it came to communicating about my allergies.

All my friends knew about my allergies. When I met my flatmates for the first, it was one of the first things I told them about. My thinking was, get the thing that could be awkward out the way first and then get on with life. It just so happened that we all took an expedition to the supermarket that day, so they saw there was plenty I could eat. I didn’t stress, so they didn’t stress.

But when it came to the confidence to say something about my food allergies it started from an understanding of my allergy (the life-death things) and my self worth.

Allergies & Your Self Worth

Everyone at some point feels insecure about something. We all have challenges, and we can all choose how we respond to those challenges.

When it comes to allergies, I know that my nut allergy is just a biological fact of my body, like my skin colour or eye colour. As much as my family might have hoped for me to outgrow it or a cure to be found, I accepted I would probably live with food allergies my entire life.

I have been trained and I keep training in my allergy care everyday. I carry my medical kit (2 adrenaline pens, antihistamine tablets, and inhalers) everywhere I go. I check all the ingredients labels and I ask about food preparation in restaurants. I have my checklist to keep me safe and I know I will keep doing it my entire life, whoever I happen to be with including friends, family, colleagues and boyfriend. Those people who are worth being in my life know and respect my allergy needs, but I know my allergy is my responsibility and I’m going to keep it that way.

I choose to take responsibility and own it, because it is mine. No one else’s. By making it my choice I start to feel more confident because I feel that I can take control of my actions within a situation. I have also found that it elevates pressure on my relationships because I am not expecting someone else to take responsibility for something they have no training in.

Having an allergic reaction at 16 was a big eye-opener for me. [LINK] I showed me so shockingly that I had to be in charge of my allergy because I am my own best advocate and showed me what my priorities were. To stay alive and stay well. By accepting this I could start dealing with my anxieties.

Dealing With Food Allergy Anxiety

Even though I know my allergy is mine and I want it to be my responsibility I still get anxious. I mean I am human. I still got anxious about telling the boy I liked about my allergy.

I think what makes us anxious when telling people about our food allergies is the fear of being rejected. Of being left out or thought of as being different. Allergies do make us different but not how you may think.

Allergies force you to eat differently but you need to because, in the case of anaphylaxis, you could die. So it’s true allergies make you different, but if you let it, allergies will set you apart. Many of the people I know who deal with allergies, many of whom are allergic from 2 to 30 allergens, are some of the most inventive and creative people I know. They have amazing problem solving skills because they think outside the box, they are so strong and keep fighting, not to mention being amazing chefs! If you want to hear some of them just check out the guests on my podcast. [LINK] (And seriously, who is going to turn down delicious food!)

My other half said to me a little while ago when I said I was feeling scared about making my truffles [LINK: ] and selling them (this is after I won an award for them by the way), “I know your scared, but do it anyway.” This has really stuck with me. It is only when we face what we’re scared or anxious about that we start to overcome it.

When I was scared of food after my allergic reaction, it was through cooking and being in control of the food I ate that I started to conquer my anxiety. I had to face the fear I had of food to overcome it. It’s the same when you have to tell someone about your allergies.

How to Tell Your Date About Your Food Allergies

So when it comes to dating, how do you tell them about your allergy?

Well, there are many mediums you could use: text, social messengers (whatsapp, viber, Facebook messenger etc), email, phone call or even in person. There are so many ways to communicate, so take your pick.

Thanks to the modern age, you don’e even have to deal with the awkward social encounter of telling someone about your allergy. You don’t even have to look them in the face! Definitely a win if you are feeling particularly shy about it.

So now over to my suggestions of telling your date about your food allergy.

Method 1. Steer the conversation to be about food

Via: Messaging/phone/in person

When you have to talk about your food allergy, the whole idea can feel incredibly awkward because in our heads, it feels like you’re randomly blurting out you have a food allergies can be blurting to the surprise of those listening. However in my experience there are ways you can steer the conversation so you can talk about your allergies and make it an interesting discussion point.

How…?

Well firstly, I steer the conversation towards food. As I have food allergies, it seems more appropriate to bring that fact up when I’m talking about food. I start on a positive note though, I talk about how much I love food, or foods I love to eat or make at home. The aim is to share my enthusiasm for something I love with the person I like. This way I am already showing them that food isn’t a problem for me but a joy. I ask them about what they like too. If I start a conversation with them, I want to get them involved in that conversation. This way it’s a two-way street and shows that I am interested in them.

Once we have conversation going, I’ll casually talk about a recipe or a favourite food and how I adapt it to be free from because I am allergic to….[insert your allergen] nuts and gluten intolerant. At this point, it usually raises questions if your date isn’t allergic to anything. I am usually prepared for some ignorant comments like “does that mean you’re a vegan?” But I can’t blame them for what they pick up from the media. I just use this as a chance to correct them as is appropriate. Not in a mean way and certainly not impatiently, but just to tell them what it means for me. I want this person to ask questions, after all if they’re going to be with me they need to know that nuts could kill me. The more they listen and ask questions the better it’s going to be for both of us.

Now the conversation is started, I often have people say “oh it must be really difficult.” But for me I say “no, it’s actually really easy because I know what makes me sick, so I know what to avoid and now it’s just second nature to check everything.” A non-allergy sufferer will take the lead from you, so show them it’s not a problem, because that will show them it won’t be a problem for your relationship.

Method 2: Show your date how you food shop with allergies

Via: In person

Sometimes the easiest way to tell someone about your allergies is actually by not saying anything at all. They do say actions speak louder than words.

If your date is someone you know from work, school, university or the gym, chances are that you will eat or go to your local supermarket together. If you haven’t yet, try and engineer it. Not only is it a good way to chat in a neutral location, but also you have the chance to show your allergy management skills in action.

How…?

So first go with your date to the local coffee cart, supermarket or vending machine. Anywhere there is food or drink gives you the chance to check ingredients labels or ask about ingredients in front of your date. Now make sure they can see you picking up different packets and checking ingredients labels. Or if you’re at the coffee cart you can ask about ingredients lists while your date is standing near you so they can ‘overhear’ the conversation your having with the barista.

If your date is looking over, or looks curious, just mention you have an allergy. It’s that simple. Through your actions your can show that you’re in control of your allergy, start a conversation and tell them why you are checking labels. You can talk about cross-contamination how sensitive you are and that it comes up in even the most unlikely places such as kissing. How even your parents are careful about eating your allergen and kissing you on the cheek! Use the opportunity to answer questions about your allergy. The more you educate before, the less awkward it will be when you get to your date. 

Getting Across The Severity of Your Food Allergy (and Flirt at the Same Time)

So now that you have introduced the subject of your allergies. How do you get your date to understand the severity?

Having to tell someone that you could die really easily always seems a bit too heavy when you don’t know someone. However, if you don’t, and you want to kiss this person…you kind of have to.  Otherwise that kiss could be your last one…

A few months ago Kortney from Allergy Girls Eats came on the podcast to talk about how she dated with her allergies. She has Oral Allergy Syndrome (allergic to many raw fruits and vegetables) as well as a severe allergies to nuts, sesame, peanuts, among others. Unfortunately for Kortney, her first date ended with an allergic reaction and a trip to the emergency room. In her case an allergic reaction quite plainly showed how severe here allergies were. Although, as we both agreed on the podcast, we would not recommend this! You can take a listen to our whole chat here

Another way is humour. Allergies are a serious subject and if you don’t have one it’s a difficult concept to comprehend. However, when my boyfriend and were getting to know each other, I would use my allergy to flirt with him. (Well a girls gotta use what she’s got to her advantage right?! I have a nut allergy so I might as well use it.)

I can’t remember exactly when I said this to my boyfriend, but it would have been early on; I said “well if you want to kiss me, you can’t have eaten nuts. So it’s up to you…” and I would just leave it there. Give a little look, you know the one I mean, kind of looking down but up at the same time, a little bat of the lashes doesn’t hurt either. But you have to mean it ladies (and gents if you’re reading this). You must follow through on your word, no kissing if they are not allergen free, It is not worth taking the risk. So preparing for your first kiss is where it starts.

On a side note…You will also have to be aware of making sure you only share allergy safe forks and drinks bottles as well.  Sticking to what is safe even though you feel bad or uncomfortable is going to be the best in the long run because hopefully you will avoid have an allergic reaction.

My First Allergy Freak Out At My Boyfriend

I was speaking with Julianne Ponan, CEO of Creative Nature, for a podcast episode (being released on February 19th) about dealing with people and allergies. We were sharing stories about how we help people ‘get’ that we have severe allergies but also how we try not to go crazy at people. For her it was an allergic reaction and the paramedic coming that proved the severity to her friends. This story got me thinking about me and my boyfriend. He has never seen me have an allergic reaction. I have been incredibly careful over the years because I know how it feels to have an allergic reaction and I never want to have one again.

So on with my freak out story…

I am generally someone who has my emotions, my life and general stuff under control. I don’t freak out much, nor get irrational, but on this occasion it was another matter.

It was a typical grey Manchester afternoon, I was in my third year of University and waiting for my boyfriend to arrive at my house. Not an uncommon occurrence obviously. We had been dating for about 18 months by this point. He has known about my severe nut allergy since we started going out and has always been really careful with what he eats. (Although he loves peanuts butter, marzipan, macadamia nuts, brazil nuts, chocolate coated nuts he stopped eating them.) He essentially has gone nut free for me.

So, he arrives at my house, I open at the door and before I can even go to kiss him he stops me.

“So you know you can get chocolate coated raisins in the pick ’n’ mix.”

“yeahhh…” I say. I was pretty sure I knew where this could be going. I never had pick ’n’ mix…

“I thought I had got the raisins” he continues, “but when I was on the bus eating them I bit into one and it wasn’t a raisin…it was a peanut.”

I feel my heart almost stop. My brain was whirring at a million miles an hour with everything that could go wrong. Then with what needed to be done to prevent it. I would like to say I dealt with it calmly and efficiently, but I’m don’t think I did. Panic had set in.

My boyfriend has just got off the bus and walked to my house so he still had peanut on his hands, that freaked me out. I just started barking instructions, “don’t touch anything. You need to wash your hands thoroughly, you need to brush your teeth. I’ll open the doors. You need to rinse your mouth and then clean the sink out after you!”

I was freaked!

Thinking back on it, it wasn’t that pleasant for him either. His girlfriend just suddenly out of the blue, went crazy. I remember a heated exchange of words at the time, not quite an argument but almost.

My boyfriend was used to me not to eat at a buffet restaurant or interrogating waiters about cooking methods in the kitchen. But this was the first time we had had to deal with a very real allergy threat together, and you know what? I think it made us stronger together.

It opened up a discussion that we had never needed before. It showed us both where there were risks we hadn’t known before. I talked about my allergic reaction and my fears with my allergy and why I freaked out like I did. I was able to share something with him that we could solve together and what it was like to have an allergic reaction. We recapped on how to use my adrenaline pens, when to use them and the procedure should I have an allergic reaction.

We often forget to educate others because we are so capable or because we are scared what they will think. From purely my own development side, I was able to learn how to manage my food allergy freak outs more effectively too and there have been a couple times since where my boyfriend has eaten nuts. But now we have a system in place. I don’t freak out every time he eats nuts, (it doesn’t happen often) but when he does we know how to manage it together. So I’m safe and it doesn’t tear us apart but make us stronger.

EAS 065: How to Bake For Allergies When You Don’t Have Any  (Elizabeth D Bakes)

EAS 065: How to Bake For Allergies When You Don’t Have Any (Elizabeth D Bakes)

Elizabeth D Bakes is a company specialising in gluten free baked goods. Started by Elizabeth, a few years ago, the company has grown from market stalls to supplying to Whole Foods Market.

What’s different about Elizabeth D Bakes is their founder does not have any allergies or intolerances. So why would someone with no personal need start a free from business? This is exactly what I ask Elizabeth.

Elizabeth takes me through her journey learning about allergies from developing recipes free from gluten, what, eggs and dairy to start, as well as cross-contamination, and how to bake safely for allergies and coeliac disease. She tells me stories of her customers and how they shaped the development of Elizabeth D Bakes.

Other questions I ask:

  • How do you source ingredients?
  • What have you learned about allergies and free from?
  • When and why did you decide to have a dedicated gluten free kitchen?
  • What was your first baking fail?
  • What has been a baking success?

Top Tips for Catering For Food allergies

  1. Don’t make assumptions
  2. Use pure ingredients, simplify
  3. Clearly label ingredients
  4. Think outside of the box

Leave a Review

Thank you to all of you who have sent me feedback. Your words of encouragement and how the podcast has helped you keeps me motivated to make more episodes!

If you haven’t already, please leave a review on iTunes.

Ask Your Questions

If you have a question about your own allergy journey or from the episode, leave a comment below or post in our very own Facebook Group.

Connect With Me

Join the Eat Allergy Safe Community on:

Subscribe to the podcast on:

EAS 064: Gluten Free Vegan Doughnuts – The Borough 22 Journey to Selfridges

Ryan Panchoo is the award winning baker and founder of Borough 22. Borough 22 is a free from startup specialising in gluten free doughnuts with many vegans options. Ryan started Borough 22 in his home kitchen and he now supplies to the likes of Selfridges, as well as local cafes and shops.

In this episode I hear the Borough 22 journey, how the need to be gluten free and dairy free at home led Ryan to start making doughnuts. He also shares what he found difficult living gluten and dairy free, how he developed his products. We talk all about the fails, the successes, and how its going now.

If you’ve ever thought about starting a business, start here. Listen to Ryan’s story and hear about his inspirations and when he decided to go full time.

Top 3 Tips For Starting a Free From Business

  1. Have a goal then work backwards to work out the steps to get there
  2. Take inspiration and learn from the big companies in your industry
  3. Know who your customer is and look after them

Leave a Review

Thank you to all of you who have sent me feedback. Your words of encouragement and how the podcast has helped you keeps me motivated to make more episodes!

If you haven’t already, please leave a review on iTunes.

Ask Your Questions

If you have a question about your own allergy journey or from the episode, leave a comment below or post in our very own Facebook Group.

Connect With Me

Join the Eat Allergy Safe Community on:

Subscribe to the podcast on:

EAS 063: Food Allergies Are a Tool For Self-Growth Failing-Up with Brandon LaBella

Brandon Labella is an author, host of the Failing Up Podcast, fellow grownup allergy kid and Food Allergy Travels Trailblazer. He has travelled to 35 countries in 3 years not letting his severe allergies to nuts, dairy and fish stop him from exploring and achieving his goals.

In today’s episode I talk to Brandon about how he prepares to travel allergy safe and dealing with allergic reactions. He shares his experiences educating people on his travels about his allergy and how you can always  turn every experience into a learning something.

Top 3 Tips When Living With Food

  1. Rather than “why me?” think “why not me?!” – use your allergy as a way to grow
  2. Get involved in a community or make a community
  3. Prepare so that you can be limitless and free to do what you want

Leave a Review

Thank you to all of you who have sent me feedback. Your words of encouragement and how the podcast has helped you keeps me motivated to make more episodes!

If you haven’t already, please leave a review on iTunes.

Ask Your Questions

If you have a question about your own allergy journey or from the episode, leave a comment below or post in our very own Facebook Group.

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EAS 062: Ending the Overwhelm of Going Allergy Free – Dr. Ellie Heintze Advises

Ellie Heintze is a doctor and acupuncturist with personal experience of living with severe food allergies. In this episode Ellie shares her journey from chemist to discovering her food allergies and how it changed her family’s life.

As I have a Doctor on the show, I about the difference between IgE, IgG, non-IgE and sensitives to food. Ellie tells me what the differences are and how the reactions can differ.

Over her personal journey and professional career, Ellie developed her “Food Allergy Formula,” an online course designed to show how the transition to eating free from allergens can be fun and easy. I ask her to walk me through her formula and how it can help other allergy sufferers and parents.

 I am really passionate about helping people make the change to eating “allergy-free” fun and easy and “ending the overwhelm.” – Ellie Heintze

Top 3 Tips When Living With Food

  1. Find support
  2. Always ask about allergens
  3. Get everyone involved! (family, friends, be involved yourself)

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Thank you to all of you who have sent me feedback. Your words of encouragement and how the podcast has helped you keeps me motivated to make more episodes!

If you haven’t already, please leave a review on iTunes.

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EAS 061: Listener Story – How To Not Be Afraid Of Food Allergies

EAS 061: Listener Story – How To Not Be Afraid Of Food Allergies

Elisabeth and her daughter Valerie are on today’s episode talking about dealing intolerances and multiple allergies including gluten, dairy, nuts, raw carrot, beef and lamb. It hasn’t been an easy road for Mum Elisabeth both with her own intolerances and managing Valerie’s allergies. Early in Valerie’s life it was about fighting for her health, figuring out what the allergen triggers were and how to keep her nourished. The doctors were very concerned in the beginning but Elisabeth didn’t give up!

Valerie is 12 years old now and loving school and all the normal stuff kids get up to. Some things she finds difficult [go to 11:00 – 18:22] but as Elisabeth has taught her, it’s about focusing on the wins and learning how to overcome challenges [27:40]. I share some of my experiences too, telling Valerie how I faced some of my allergy fears when I was her age.

Check out her comic below. It’s the story of her ice cream allergy win! Go to 31:08 to listen to her story.

Top 3 Tips When Living With Food Allergies

  1. Don’t be afraid to try
  2. Be thankful for what you have and never feel like you’ve done anything wrong
  3. Always keep looking for what helps

Leave a Review

Thank you to all of you who have sent me feedback. Your words of encouragement and how the podcast has helped you keeps me motivated to make more episodes!

If you haven’t already, please leave a review on iTunes.

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If you have a question about your own allergy journey or from the episode, leave a comment below or post in our very own Facebook Group.

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EAS 060: Daily Allergic Reactions to pre-OIT – Nathalie Rhone Tells All (NoNuts4Me)

What do you do when you’re first diagnosed with allergies? The doctors give you a shock of a lifetime telling you something could kill you and then often just leave you to it. What do you do then?

In this episode I’m welcoming back Nathalie Rhone from episode 56. Today we talk about how she manages the stress of Oral Allergy Syndrome (OAS) knowing 30 of the allergens that make her sick and knowing there are others. Nathalie takes us through her first doctor visit, what they told her and her diagnosis being allergic to carrots.

Currently she is under the supervision of her allergist in the pre-stages of Oral Immunotherapy Treatment (OIT) and introducing new foods to her diet. She has experienced the full spectrum of food allergy anxiety, but it’s still not stopping her live her life to the full.

Nathalie is going to take us through her learning curve, what she learned from managing her allergy, how she deals with doctors and how she manages allergic reactions. Most notably we talk at length about when and how to use your Adrenaline Auto-Injector pen (AAI).

Top 3 Tips

  1. Don’t trust anyone else with your allergies
  2. Always carry your medicine with you (adrenaline pen, anti-histamines, inhalers)
  3. You will find out who your real friends are

Leave a Review

Thank you to all of you who have sent me feedback. Your words of encouragement and how the podcast has helped you keeps me motivated to make more episodes!

If you haven’t already, please leave a review on iTunes.

Ask Your Questions

If you have a question about your own allergy journey or from the episode, leave a comment below or post in our very own Facebook Group.

Connect With Me

Join the Eat Allergy Safe Community on:

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